Women on the front-line

By: 
CARE
Mildrède Béliard, working in communities in Haiti to prevent the spread of cholera and distribute soap and chlorine tablets

In 2014, only 1% of all funding in fragile states went to women’s groups. This was despite pressing evidence showing that when women are meaningfully engaged in humanitarian response, and their needs are directly addressed, interventions are more  effective, and transition to recovery is accelerated for the whole community.

The World Humanitarian Summit next week must seek strengthened political commitment and practical action to protect women and girls from violence, and support the inspiring and tireless efforts by women activists who are leading efforts to assist those in need – their voice should be heard and their efforts bolstered. 

Here are some of the inspiring women working on the front-line of our emergency response...

Olfat Al Aqili, Azraq Center Coordinator, Aqraq refugee camp, Jordan
"As a working woman, I have seen how slowly not only the children, but grown men, also started to accept my presence in the camp. Five years from now, I picture myself where I am now - still working directly with people affected by this crisis. But my hope is there will more work on women’s empowerment in the camp, with a centre and a strategy and that I can help build this.” Olfat Al Aqili works with CARE International in Jordan as a refugee centre coordinator in Azraq camp.
Rachele Nsii is now the president of a farming group, DRC
“We cannot always rely on humanitarians in an emergency; they can take a while to respond,” Rachele explains as she scales a field of beans and bananas.  Rachele steers the negotiations for the land that internally displaced people cultivate.  She is helping to create an emergency food stock for the new wave of displaced people.  The 84 farmers she coordinates have also chosen to sell part of the harvest so they can buy livestock for future income generation. A displaced person, herself, Rachele Nsii is now the president of a farming group, created by a project committee supported by CARE International.

 

Yashoda Zuhar supported CARE Nepal's gender team after the earthquakes in 2015. She says: "People have lost their houses, but they have not lost their hopes"
Yashoda Zuhar supported CARE Nepal's gender team after the earthquakes in 2015. She says: "People have lost their houses, but they have not lost their hopes" 

 

Shereen*, a Syrian refugee in Turkey, volunteers with CARE to raise awareness about the risks of child marriage in the community
Shereen, a Syrian refugee in Turkey, volunteers with CARE to raise awareness about the risks of child marriage in the community 
Bushra Aldukainah is Humanitarian Coordinator for CARE Yemen. Her role includes leading all the humanitarian activities in Hajjah province supporting internally displaced people and host communities mainly with livelihoods, water, sanit
Bushra Aldukainah is Humanitarian Coordinator for CARE Yemen. Her role includes leading all the humanitarian activities in Hajjah province - supporting internally displaced people and host communities mainly with livelihoods, water, sanitation and hygiene promotion support. 

 

Lobina Dawe, 30 is a farmer and mother-of-three from Waliranji Village, District: Mchinji. Lobina is a member of the 10-woman strong unit known locally as the ‘Mothers Group’.
Lobina Dawe, 30 is a farmer and mother-of-three from Waliranji Village, Malawi. Lobina is a member of the 10-woman strong unit known locally as the ‘Mothers Group’. She and the other women in her group volunteer their time for CARE to visit the parents of children who have dropped out of school and encourage them to prioritise their children’s education. Once a month they also come together to do farm work to earn money to help parents who are particularly struggling to afford school items such as uniforms, soap and reading and writing materials. 
Staff Nurse Arenda Madoun, checks over a two-week-old baby in a medical centre in Jabalaya, Gaza, during the conflict in 2014
Staff Nurse Arenda Madoun, checks over a two-week-old baby in a medical centre in Jabalaya, Gaza, during the conflict in 2014
Rose Vive is a CARE staff member in Goma, DRC. She is responsible for a project that uses a community based approach to combat sexual violence and empower women to take care for themselves and their families
Rose Vive is a CARE staff member in Goma, DRC. She is responsible for a project that uses a community based approach to combat sexual violence and empower women to take care of themselves and their families 
Nesreen fled Syria two months ago. She is now volunteering as a teacher with CARE at Azraq camp, Jordan
Nesreen, 35, fled Syria two years ago. She had to walk for ten hours, drive in a bus for ten hours and wait in the desert for five days before she entered Azraq Camp. Her husband is in a hospital in Amman. She has one son. This picture was taken on her first day of volunteering as a teacher in a school in Azraq, Jordan. She used to be an English teacher in Syria.

 

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News and stories are provided by CARE staff working to support our emergency responses and long-term development programmes.